I can’t do much since I lost my sight. I can eat and I can talk! That’s okay for me; I’m happy enough. Why worry about things that have already happened? - Tulsi Maya Ghale

Former British Gurkha veterans threaten to launch hunger strike if their demands for compension and pension parity not met

KATHMANDU, April 7:  Alleging that the UK government had failed to give heed to their genuine demands of parity in the pension and other perks and facilities with their British counterparts, the agitating British Gurkha Satyagraha United Struggle Committee UK-Nepal (BGSUSC UK-Nepal) has threatened to launch hunger strike from July. Organizing a press conference in Kathmandu, the agitating […]

पूर्व ब्रिटिस गोरखा सत्याग्रह सयुक्त संघर्ष समितिको कार्यक्रम ।

पूर्व ब्रिटिस गोरखा सत्याग्रह सयुक्त संघर्ष समितिको कार्यक्रम ।

Message From Chief Coordinator

It has been 205 years since Nepal and the UK entered into a bilateral relationship. In all those years, more than 250,000 Nepali Gurkha soldiers shed blood, sweat and tears for the UK. Many died, many untraceable till date. NeitherNepal government nor the UK government have an accurate record of it. Hopefully this is will […]

I can’t do much since I lost my sight. I can eat and I can talk! That’s okay for me; I’m happy enough. Why worry about things that have already happened?

Rambahadur Limbu

Bhanbhagta Gurung

Bhanbhagta Gurung was once about 24 years old, and a Rifleman in the third Battalion, 2nd Gurkha Rifles, British Indian Army when the following deed took location for which he used to be awarded the VC: On 5 March 1945 at Snowdon-East, close to Tamandu, Burma (now Myanmar), Gurung and his unit have been coming […]

Ganju Lama

Ganju Lama was once born in Sangmo, southern Sikkim, India, on 22 July 1924. He enlisted in British Gurkha Army in 1942 at the age of seventeen. His mother and father had been each of Sikkimese Bhutia descent and lived in Sikkim, which made him unusual, as he used to be neither an ethnic Gurkha […]

Lachhiman Gurung

Gurung was once born on December 30, 1917, in the village of Dahakhani, Chitwan District of Nepal, the son of Partiman Gurung.[3] He joined the British Indian Army in December 1940, authorized to enlist in wartime even though he used to be solely 4’11” (1.5m) tall and so under the peacetime minimal height.[4][5] He was […]

Thaman Gurung

He used to be 20 years old, and a Rifleman in the 1st Battalion, fifth Royal Gurkha Rifles (Frontier Force), in the Indian Army all through World War II when the following deed took region for which he was once awarded the VC. The quotation in the London Gazette reads: In Italy on 10 November […]